Saturday, September 19

RFID Chip Tech ‘Could’ Be Used In Prefilled Syringes For Future COVID-19 Vaccine

RFID Chip Tech ‘Could’ Be Used in Prefilled Syringes For Future COVID-19 Vaccine

From U.S. Department of Defense, Washington

Statement attributed to Lt. Col. Mike Andrews, Department of Defense spokesman: “Today the Department of Defense and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, announce a $138 million contract with ApiJect Systems America for “Project Jumpstart” and “RAPID USA,” which together will dramatically expand U.S. production capability for domestically manufactured, medical-grade injection devices starting by October 2020.

Spearheaded by the DOD’s Joint Acquisition Task Force (JATF), in coordination with the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, the contract will support “Jumpstart” to create a U.S.-based, high-speed supply chain for prefilled syringes beginning later this year by using well-established Blow-Fill-Seal (BFS) aseptic plastics manufacturing technology, suitable for combatting COVID-19 when a safe and proven vaccine becomes available.”

Additional Notes:

President Trump stated hewill mobilize military to distribute the vaccine, when it becomes available. 

ApiJect is a founding member of the Rapid Consortium. A YouTube video produced by the organization states, “These facilities will make enough prefilled syringes to inject every man, woman, and child in America with just the right dose 30 days after a vaccine becomes available. Plus every prefilled syringe can have an RFID chip attached. This will allow healthcare workers to use their mobile phones to automatically capture where and when every injection takes place, helping public health officials make more informed decisions.”

On ApiJect’s website,  they explain further:

A Digital “Snapshot” for Every Injection Given

Whether health officials are running a scheduled vaccination program or an urgent pandemic response campaign, they can make better decisions if they know when and where each injection occurs. With an optional RFID/NFC tag on each BFS prefilled syringe, ApiJect will make this possible. Before giving an injection, the healthcare worker will be able to launch a free mobile app and “tap” the prefilled syringe on their phone, capturing the NFC tag’s unique serial number, GPS location, and date/time. The app then uploads the data to a government-selected cloud database. Aggregated injection data provides health administrators with an evolving real-time “injection map.”  

View the Press Release

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *